raynola

Now you are here, at 7:43. Now you are here, at 7:44. Now you are…gone.

The best chastening I ever received from a teacher was in graduate school. I was in a poetry workshop at Iowa. The poet Dean Young was my teacher. I came in with this highly intellectualized poem about I don’t know what. I somehow thought it was appropriate to ask him a question about Wittgenstein in his fucking poetry class. The way he answered me was, he said this: “Sarah, I only have about forty years left to live.” That continues to be one of the things that reminds me that I need not write or think out of an obligation to whatever I think is important or appropriate or necessary outside my own need to write, comma, to write.

Imperfect Tools, Melissa Seley Interviews Sarah Manguso - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

This interview is so, so good.

(via embfitz)

(via embfitz)

Whiskey bottle over Jesus
Not forever, just for now

(Source: Spotify)

gimme a break kid, ‘cause you don’t know anything

about screaming to the stars

when it’s just you and them and an empty hole 

you try to fill with something more than a flicker

when it’s just you and them and an empty hole 

and you’re trying to fill it up

embfitz:

I am getting VERY, VERY tired of the Internet thinking that the only way women experience inequality is by being viewed as fantastical sex objects who won’t put out on demand.
That is not to de-legitimize that problem, of course. It exists. Of course it does.
But if I have to check the box above, and there’s absolutely nothing to not-check about, for example, workplace discrimination? It’s hard to think of this as anything other than 23 year old writer axe-grinding. And that’s really too bad.
Not even linking to it. 

embfitz:

I am getting VERY, VERY tired of the Internet thinking that the only way women experience inequality is by being viewed as fantastical sex objects who won’t put out on demand.

That is not to de-legitimize that problem, of course. It exists. Of course it does.

But if I have to check the box above, and there’s absolutely nothing to not-check about, for example, workplace discrimination? It’s hard to think of this as anything other than 23 year old writer axe-grinding. And that’s really too bad.

Not even linking to it. 

scanis:

"Her and Lost In Translation are connected to each other. They’re very much on the same wavelength. They explore a lot of the same ideas. This all makes sense since Spike Jonze and Sofia Coppola were married from 1999 to 2003 and had been together for many years before that. Sofia Coppola had already made her big personal statement in regards to love and marriage right when the couple was on the verge of divorce; Her would be Spike Jonze’s answer to those feelings. What makes it even more poignant is that Her never feels resentful or petty. It feels more like a legitimate apology. It’s an acknowledgement that, in the end, some people aren’t meant to be with each other in the long run. Some people do grow apart. Lost in Translation is about a couple on the verge of growing apart, Her is about finally letting go of the person you’ve grown apart with and moving on.”

(via rubyleerose)

c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 
From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 

From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

(via thedeathoffilm)

Endings of Jesus’ Son

(mild muted epiphany spoilers)

"It was raining. Gigantic ferns leaned over us. The forest drifted down a hill. I could hear a creek rushing down among rocks. And you, you ridiculous people, you expect me to help you."

Car Crash While Hitchhiking

"The people with him, all friends of ours, monitored his breathing by holding a pocket mirror under his nostrils from time to time, making sure that points of mist appeared on the glass. But after a while they forgot about him, and his breath failed without anybody’s noticing. He simply went under. He died.

I am still alive.”

Out on Bail

"Will you believe me when I tell you there was kindness in his heart? His left hand didn’t know what his right hand was doing. It was only that certain important connections had been burned through. If I opened up your head and ran a hot soldering iron around in your brain, I might turn you into someone like that."

Dundun

"I’ll never forget you. Your husband will beat you with an extension cord and the bus will pull away leaving you standing there in tears, but you were my mother."

Work

"After a while Hardee asked Georgie, ‘What do you do for a job,’ and Georgie said, ‘I save lives.’"

Emergency

"Talk into my bullet hole. Tell me I’m fine."

Steady Hands at Seattle General

"All these weirdos, and me getting a little better every day right in the midst of them. I had never known, never even imagined for a heartbeat, that there might be a place for people like us."

Beverly Home

Karl Ove Knausgaard is Your Favorite Author's Favorite Author

"Knausgaard believes that to create literature of lasting value, a writer must try to carve out a freedom from the strictures of society, to stand outside the realm where consideration comes before honesty. It’s an important principle, he thinks—but it carries no weight on a human level. “I … am … the guilty one,” he said, drawing out the words. “And I can’t defend myself. I can defend myself in principle, but not in those individual cases."

1 week ago - 1

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

"We have a word for that in Japanese," he said. "It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally.”

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

"I don’t think it’s like the pillow word." He clapped his hands three or four times. "The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness. But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb.

Rogert Ebert, on Hayao Miyazaki (via jespresso)mind (via iwrotedownmyworld)

(Source: improv-is-easy, via iwrotedownmyworld)